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When Religious Geography meets the Geography of Humanists.: The Tabula moderna Terrae Sanctae in the Copies of the ‘Geography’ of Ptolemy in the Fifteenth Century.

Abstract : In 1321, Marino Sanudo Torsello presented the crusade project entitled ‘Liber Secretorum Fidelium Crucis’, the ‘Book of Secrets of the Faithful of the Cross’ to Pope John XXII. Among themaps that accompany the project, the representation of the Holy Land is one of the best-known medieval maps, both for its content and for its original construction. Firstly, with regards to content, this map locates the main places visited by Christian pilgrims, according to the Old and New Testaments, following the description of the Holy Land by Burchard of Mount Sion (thirteenth century). Regarding its shape, the places described in the text are arranged on the map according to a grid which allows the reader, via a system of coordinates, to find the location of each placename in a precise cell of the grid. This document served as a model for a large number of representations of the Holy Land, from the thirteenth to the sixteenth century, in the context of pilgrimage narratives in which the religious dimension of the places appeared fully. The map was also inserted alongside the maps of Ptolemy’s ‘Geography’, first in the manuscript copies composed by Nicolas Germanus in the second half of the fifteenth century, and in the printed editions of the book, from the Ulm edition of 1482 and 1486, later with commentaries of Johannes Reger and Johannes Peregrinus. In Florence, the Italian author Francesco Berlinghieri included this map in his ‘Septe giornate della Geographia’, an adaptation of Ptolemy’s work in Italian verse (1482), and Henricus Martellus inserted it in his ‘Insularium Illustratum’ (c. 1490). The aim of this paper is to ask to what extent the religious character of the map of the Holy Land of Marino Sanudo, related to the context of pilgrimages and crusades during the fourteenth century, was preserved or not when inserted into Ptolemy’s ‘Geography’ or other humanist geographic works.We will study how the context of reception of this map in the humanist culture of the Renaissance, in Germany and in Italy, could change its meaning and interpretation.
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https://halshs.archives-ouvertes.fr/halshs-03095681
Contributor : Emmanuelle Vagnon <>
Submitted on : Monday, January 4, 2021 - 5:05:22 PM
Last modification on : Tuesday, January 19, 2021 - 11:08:22 AM

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Emmanuelle Vagnon. When Religious Geography meets the Geography of Humanists.: The Tabula moderna Terrae Sanctae in the Copies of the ‘Geography’ of Ptolemy in the Fifteenth Century.. Christoph MAUNTEL. Geography and Religious Knowledge in the Medieval World, De Gruyter, pp.223-246, In press, 978-3-11-068595-4. ⟨10.1515/9783110686159-010⟩. ⟨halshs-03095681⟩

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