Skip to Main content Skip to Navigation
Journal articles

Past mining activities in the Vosges Mountains (eastern France): Impact on vegetation and metal contamination over the past millennium

Abstract : Coring was carried out in a soligenous marsh in the Vosges Mountains in the past mining district of Sainte-Marie-aux-Mines (eastern France). High resolution palynological, non-pollen-palynomorph, and geochemical analyses were performed along the core. Correlations between the herbal composition of the landscape and trace metals in the core reveal a specific palynological pattern during mining activities. Two main periods of anthropogenic impacts on vegetation and trace metal contamination are shown: during the 16th–17th centuries, for mining and smelting activities, and the beginning of the 20th century, for smelting and the Industrial Revolution. No drastic deforestations occurred near the study site, contrary to historical descriptions and prints of the valley. Controlled forest practices were implemented from the beginning of the record, that is, since cal. AD 1000, so the impact of mining activities seems to be less significant than expected near mining sites. We demonstrate that the minerotrophic characteristics of the record closest to past mining sites allows for (1) the description of the landscape associated with anthropogenic activities and (2) the recording of past trace metal emissions without post-depositional mobility.
Complete list of metadatas

https://halshs.archives-ouvertes.fr/halshs-02545077
Contributor : Joseph Gauthier <>
Submitted on : Thursday, April 16, 2020 - 5:25:16 PM
Last modification on : Monday, October 12, 2020 - 8:46:07 AM

Identifiers

Citation

Anne-Lise Mariet, Carole Bégeot, Frédéric Gimbert, Joseph Gauthier, Pierre Fluck, et al.. Past mining activities in the Vosges Mountains (eastern France): Impact on vegetation and metal contamination over the past millennium. The holocene, London: Sage, 2016, 26 (8), pp.1225-1236. ⟨10.1177/0959683616638419⟩. ⟨halshs-02545077⟩

Share

Metrics

Record views

56