Skip to Main content Skip to Navigation
Journal articles

Life goes on: Archaeobotanical investigations of diet and ritual at Angkor Thom, Cambodia (14th–15th centuries CE)

Abstract : This is the first time an archaeobotanical analysis based on macroremains, both charred and desiccated, from Cambodia is reported. The archaeobotanical samples are rich and provide evidence of rice processing, consumption of non-indigenous pulses, and the use of economic crops. The evidence is supported by data from inscriptions, texts and historical ethnography. This study demonstrates that the city of Angkor in the 14th and 15th centuries CE, despite its decline, was still occupied. Angkor’s inhabitants continued their everyday lives cultivating and consuming their staple food, rice, with a suite of pulses, and also used the harvests in the performance of rituals.
Complete list of metadatas

Cited literature [121 references]  Display  Hide  Download

https://halshs.archives-ouvertes.fr/halshs-02477429
Contributor : Efeo Ecole Française d'Extrême-Orient <>
Submitted on : Thursday, February 13, 2020 - 1:22:35 PM
Last modification on : Thursday, July 30, 2020 - 3:17:36 AM
Long-term archiving on: : Thursday, May 14, 2020 - 3:29:08 PM

File

0959683617752841.pdf
Publication funded by an institution

Identifiers

Collections

Citation

Cristina Cobo Castillo, Martin Polkinghorne, Brice Vincent, Tan Boun Suy, Dorian Fuller. Life goes on: Archaeobotanical investigations of diet and ritual at Angkor Thom, Cambodia (14th–15th centuries CE). The holocene, London: Sage, 2018, 28 (6), pp.930-944. ⟨10.1177/0959683617752841⟩. ⟨halshs-02477429⟩

Share

Metrics

Record views

127

Files downloads

207