Stealing to Survive? Crime and Income Shocks in Nineteenth Century France

Abstract : Using local administrative data from 1826 to 1936, we document the evolution of crime rates in nineteenth century France and we estimate the impact of a negative income shock on crime. Our identification strategy exploits the phylloxera crisis. Between 1863 and 1890, phylloxera destroyed about 40% of French vineyards. We use the geographical variation in the timing of this shock to identify its impact on property and violent crime rates, as well as minor offences. Our estimates suggest that the phylloxera crisis caused a substantial increase in property crime rates and a significant decrease in violent crimes.
Keywords : crime rate
Type de document :
Article dans une revue
The Economic Journal, 2017, 127 (599), pp.19-49. 〈10.1111/ecoj.12270〉
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https://halshs.archives-ouvertes.fr/halshs-01513303
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Soumis le : lundi 24 avril 2017 - 21:38:23
Dernière modification le : lundi 2 octobre 2017 - 14:40:02

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Vincent Bignon, Eve Caroli, Roberto Galbiati. Stealing to Survive? Crime and Income Shocks in Nineteenth Century France. The Economic Journal, 2017, 127 (599), pp.19-49. 〈10.1111/ecoj.12270〉. 〈halshs-01513303〉

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