Skip to Main content Skip to Navigation
Journal articles

A European Mitochondrial Haplotype Identified in Ancient Phoenician Remains from Carthage, North Africa

Abstract : While Phoenician culture and trade networks had a significant impact onWestern civilizations, we know little about the Phoenicians themselves. In 1994, a Punic burial crypt was discovered on Byrsa Hill, near the entry to the National Museum of Carthage in Tunisia. Inside this crypt were the remains of a young man along with a range of burial goods, all dating to the late 6th century BCE. Here we describe the complete mitochondrial genome recovered from the Young Man of Byrsa and identify that he carried a rare European haplogroup, likely linking his maternal ancestry to Phoenician influenced locations somewhere on the North Mediterranean coast, the islands of the Mediterranean or the Iberian Peninsula. This result not only provides the first direct ancient DNA evidence of a Phoenician individual but the earliest evidence of a European mitochondrial haplogroup, U5b2c1, in North Africa.
Document type :
Journal articles
Complete list of metadatas

Cited literature [62 references]  Display  Hide  Download

https://halshs.archives-ouvertes.fr/halshs-01479921
Contributor : Jean-Paul Morel <>
Submitted on : Thursday, May 4, 2017 - 12:08:41 PM
Last modification on : Wednesday, July 15, 2020 - 12:34:01 PM
Long-term archiving on: : Saturday, August 5, 2017 - 12:52:43 PM

File

European_Mitochondrial_Haploty...
Publisher files allowed on an open archive

Identifiers

Collections

Citation

Elizabeth A. Matisoo-Smith, Anna L. Gosling, James Boocock, Olga Kardailsky, Yara Kurumilian, et al.. A European Mitochondrial Haplotype Identified in Ancient Phoenician Remains from Carthage, North Africa. PLoS ONE, Public Library of Science, 2016, ⟨10.1371/journal.pone.0155046⟩. ⟨halshs-01479921⟩

Share

Metrics

Record views

212

Files downloads

2613