Sociology and political science in the patrimonial society: implications of Piketty's Capital

Abstract : What are the implications of Piketty's Capital for sociology and political science? Capital's argument focuses on the evolution of the r/g ratio (capital returns over growth rate) and outlines two modes of economic inequalities. One is characteristic of affluent (g > r) societies and the other is characteristic of patrimonial (r > g) societies. With the current return to a patrimonial society, corporations become political actors; occupational status and education's relevance are declining; the meaning of poverty is transformed, and welfare and punishment become interdependent means to social order; in politics, elitist theories gain traction; immigration is less about assimilation, and more about transnationalism and nationalist politics. We show that some theories are more relevant in an affluent society, and others are more adequate to a patrimonial society.
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https://halshs.archives-ouvertes.fr/halshs-01060570
Contributor : Francois Bonnet <>
Submitted on : Wednesday, September 3, 2014 - 11:29:52 PM
Last modification on : Tuesday, March 13, 2018 - 4:40:05 PM
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François Bonnet, Clément Théry. Sociology and political science in the patrimonial society: implications of Piketty's Capital. 2014. ⟨halshs-01060570⟩

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