How do African populations perceive corruption: microeconomic evidence from Afrobarometer data in twelve countries

Abstract : In this paper, we examine the microeconomic determinants of the perception of corruption in twelve Sub-Saharan African countries. Unlike the indicators of corruption based on the opinion of international experts, the study focuses on corrupt practices as experienced by the African people themselves. The results of our estimates, using an ordered probit indicate that the individual characteristics such as age and sex significantly affect the perception people have of corruption as do social and political factors like access to information (press, media, radio). However, neither democracy nor participation in demonstrations, seem to affect the attitude of individuals towards corruption.
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Submitted on : Monday, January 17, 2011 - 5:24:48 PM
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Gbewopo Attila. How do African populations perceive corruption: microeconomic evidence from Afrobarometer data in twelve countries. 2011. ⟨halshs-00556805⟩

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