Neanderthal acculturation in Western Europe? A critical review of the evidence and its interpretation

Abstract : The presence of bone tools, personal ornaments, and apparently "modern" stone tools in European late Middle Paleolithic or pre- Aurignacian Paleolithic contexts is generally interpreted as the result of the acculturation of final Neanderthal populations by anatomically modern humans. Analysis of the stratigraphic, chronological, and archaeological data from the key site of Grotte du Renne (Arcy-sur-Cure, France) shows that the notion of acculturation, as commonly understood, is inconsistent with the evidence. It is argued here that this site is not an exceptional case and is best explained by models of independent development that are supported by a reevaluation of Châtelperronian technology and by the patterns of chronological and geographical distribution of Aurignacian, Châtelperronian, Uluzzian, and late Mousterian settlements.
Type de document :
Article dans une revue
Current Anthropology, University of Chicago Press, 1998, 39, pp.1-44
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https://halshs.archives-ouvertes.fr/halshs-00453403
Contributeur : Jean-Bernard Huchet <>
Soumis le : jeudi 4 février 2010 - 15:20:20
Dernière modification le : vendredi 14 septembre 2018 - 09:56:03

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  • HAL Id : halshs-00453403, version 1

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Francesco D'Errico, João Zilhão, Michèle Julien, Dominique Baffier, Jacques Pelegrin. Neanderthal acculturation in Western Europe? A critical review of the evidence and its interpretation. Current Anthropology, University of Chicago Press, 1998, 39, pp.1-44. 〈halshs-00453403〉

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